Gender Equity in Education: A Data Snapshot

This topic really interested me to see if there is any disparity between genders in education.  I found an article that shared interesting data that indicates that we really still have a way to go to achieve full gender equity among students in the United States.

Some highlights from the article shared that:

Girls are less likely to be held back than boys.

Regarding high school courses:
Girls are evenly represented in biology, outnumber boys in chemistry, and are underrepresented in physics.
There is equitable representation for rigorous math courses.
Girls outnumber boys in many Advanced Placement courses including science and foreign language.  In Advanced Placement Calculus and Statistics, boy have consistently outnumbered girls.

Rate of female enrollment in certain career clusters still remains relatively low.

Girls of all races are suspended out-of-school at lower rates than boys of the same race.  African-American girls are suspended at higher rates than Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander and White girls.

Girls represent 55% of the sample reported to have been bullied or harassed on basis of sex.
Boys represented 79.6% of 92,000 students in sample disciplined for bullying/harassment on basis of sex.

These were some interesting things I highlighted from the article.  You can check out the full one here:

http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/gender-equity-in-education.pdf

Friends in Europe, I look forward to hearing from you about what gender equity may look like in your educational field.

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One response to “Gender Equity in Education: A Data Snapshot

  1. Your point about career or class clusters is something I have been thinking about this year when looking at the demographics of students in technology related courses within the high school I am currently interning. The majority of technology classes have no female students or just a few. This was noteworthy to me after the first teacher observation I completed of one of these courses and caused me to question the cause. Are girls less interested in these classes? If so, why? What is deterring them? Is guidance less likely to suggest this pathway when scheduling female students for courses? Are technology courses promoted to all students equally? What are teachers and administrators doing to promote gender equality within the school system? The first step is to identify the problem and a need for change. We are now looking at bringing stakeholders (guidance counselors, teachers, administrators, and students) together to develop a plan to promote gender equality in the technology department in the high school.

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